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Coleoptera of Great Smoky Mountains National Park Species Pages

Family Eucnemidae

            Tribe Dirrhagini

 Dirrhagofarsus lewisi (Fleutiaux)

Description and Taxonomy

Length 4.5-10mm. In addition to tribal characters (prominent lateral pronotal ridges, notosternal antennal grooves, deep pits near procoxae) the species may be diagnosed by produced elytral apices in combination with lateral frontal keels above the eyes. The species is native to eastern Asia and was apparently accidentally introduced to the United States from Japan in the 1970s (Ford & Spilman 1979). Lack of collection records prior to this period supports the idea of a recent introduction.

Life History

Specimens from the GSMNP were collected using Malaise traps and lights. The species is relatively common and widespread in the Park. Specimens were collected from early May to mid August at 420-925 m elevation.  The life history is poorly known. The only host reported is Fagus. Adults were attracted to clean wet sapwood, where they mated and oviposited at night according to Ford & Spilman (1979). Larva and pupa were also described by Ford & Spilman (1979).

Distribution

The distribution in North America seems to be restricted to the east, but is poorly known. The species was recorded from Georgia, Louisiana, Maryland, North Carolina, Pennsylvania and West Virginia (Muona 2000; Tishechkin, unpublished).

Conservation Concerns

Not under threat.

 

Locality records in GSMNP.

Acknowledgements

Development of these pages was supported by grants from Discover Life in America and the National Science Foundation (DEB-0516311). .

References

Ford, E.J. and T. J. Spilman. 1979. Biology and immature stages of Dirrhagofarsus lewisi, a species new to th United States (Coleoptera, Eucnemidae). Coleoptersist Bulletin 33: 75-83.

Muona, J. 2001.  A revision of North American Eucnemidae. Acta Zoologica Fennica 212: 1-106.

 

Posted 5 Feb. 2007, A. K. Tishechkin, Louisiana State Arthropod Museum.

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